Autism Unlocked

Here are some directions and pointers for using Talk to Learn.  Once the main Talk to Learn page is loaded you will see a big key on the bottom that says start.  Press the start key and you will go to a character and scene selection page.  Users will have three characters to choose from Alison, Jeff, and Billy.  Users will then need to choose from 6 scenic backgrounds winter, desert, field, moon, a spaceship, or an island.  Once the user selects character and scene selections hit the start talking button to begin the game.


Talk to Learn game play - The game will start with an animated character saying, Hello.”  Users will have to respond by typing a correct response Hello or Hi.  If the user responds correctly they will advance to level 2.  If an incorrect response is entered then a “do not understand” screen will appear.  The user will be given as many opportunities as needed to give a correct response.  Notice on the right side of the screen there is a red visual timer the timer will refresh every time a user attempts type.  If there is no attempt to type, then the timer will expire after 15 seconds, and a visual selection of three answers will appear.  The user will have to select the correct answer out of the selection of 3 answers.  The user will have to click on the correct answer before advancing to the next level.       


Below are the questions users will be asked when playing Talk to Learn.  Levels 1-7 will ask only basic questions and require only 1 word answers.  Levels 8-15 will ask two part questions.  Levels 16-20 will ask 3 part questions.  Levels 20-24 will ask 3 part questions but will require the user to respond using full sentence answers.  Each question will accept a wide variety of answers and does not require perfect spelling (we decided to do this to promote initiation instead of getting hung up on perfect spelling.)  Basic greeting questions will accept a variety of answers for example:  Good Morning/Good Afternoon will accept an answer of Good Morning/Good Afternoon, Hello, or Hi.  If a user does not know or is unable to answer a question please let the timer expire.

Level 1 - Hello

Level 2 - Good morning or good afternoon (depending on the time of day)

Level 3 - How are you today?

Level 4 - What is your name?

Level 5 - How old are you?

Level 6 - Where do you go to school?

Level 7 - Do you like going to school?

Begin - Two part questions

Level 8 - Hello.  Good afternoon

Level 9 - Hi.  How are you today?

Level 10 - Hi.  I like your shirt.

Level 11 - Hi.  What city do you live in?

Level 12 - Hi.  Where do you go to school?

Level 13 - Hi. What state do you live in?

Level 14 - Hi.  Do you like going to school?

Level 15 - Hello.  What is your favorite color?

Begin - 3 part questions.

Level 16 - Hello.  What is your name?  Nice to meet you (respond with thanks.)

Level 17 - Hi.  How are you?  I am glad to hear you are good (respond with thanks.)

Level 18 - Hi.  What city do you live in?  Do you like living there?

Level 19 - Hi.  Where do you go to school?  Do you like going to school?

Level 20 - Hi.  What is your teachers name?  Do you like your teacher?

Begin - Answers require full sentence answers

Level 21 - Hi.  What is your name?  Nice to meet you.

Level 22 - Hi.  How are you?  I am glad to hear you are good.

Level 23 - Hi.  What city do you live in?  Do you like living there?

Level 24 - Hi.  Where do you go to school?  Do you like your school?


Talk to Learn is very repetitive and will ask users to respond to Hi, Hello, Good Morning or Good Afternoon on almost every level.  Having users repetitively respond to basic greetings will efficiently improve initiation skills.  As users get continuous practice with basic greeting skills initiation skills will transfer to more complex questions.  Talk to Learn was created to give users a means of continuous and repetitive practice.  The more time a user practices the better the chance skills will begin to develop.

Keep in mind the more severe the ASD the more practice a user will need.  Talk to Learn was created with repetitive and continuous practice for the ASD user in mind.  Keep in mind in may take 1,000 or more times reciprocating levels 1-5 before they are ready to move onto more complex levels.  If this is the case then only set up levels 1-5 before they earn the fun page.  Remember: independence means users are completing levels with little or no help!  Don’t be afraid to let them be independent!